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Save the Bears by Cynpai Save the Bears by Cynpai

Bears (Family: Ursidae)

Giant Panda by Sheilalau, public domain
Asiatic Black Bear by Guérin Nicolas, licensed under GNU Free Documentation Version 1.2
Sloth Bear by Asiir, public domain
Sun Bear by Tambako the Jaguar, CC BY-SA 2.0
Spectacled Bear by Kuribo, CC BY-SA 3.0


Subspecies


Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
Status: Endangered
Threats: Habitat restriction, habitat degradation, natural bamboo die-offs, unwillingness/disinterest in mating
Current estimated population (2008): 1,000-2,000 wild individuals, declining
 
Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus)
Status: Vulnerable
Threats: Habitat loss, habitat degradation, high demand for body parts
Current estimated population (2008): No reliable data, declining
 
Sloth Bear (Melursus ursinus)
Status: Vulnerable
Threats: Habitat loss, habitat degradation, poaching, capture of live cubs for use as "dancing bears," conflict with humans, predation by large cats like tigers and leopards
Current estimated population (2008): Approximately 20,000 with <10,000 mature individuals, declining

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus)
Status: Vulnerable
Threats: Habitat loss, habitat degradation, commercial poaching, demand for body parts, capture of live cubs for pets, human fear, poaching to prevent crop damage
Current estimated population (2008): No reliable data, declining

Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus)
Status: Vulnerable
Threats: Habitat loss, habitat fragmentation, poaching, lack of population study
Current estimated population (2008): No reliable data, declining

NOTE: The polar bear is not listed here. Current assessments are out-of-date, and were not performed accurately. The polar bear population is difficult to assess due in part to the harsh environments they reside in, and because it has become a political tool in the environmentalist war against oil and natural gas. Thus, unbiased assessments of their populations do not currently exist. However, Inuit natives report that polar bears are an increasingly common sight, and appear to be thriving.



SIMILAR STAMPS
Bile is Vile by Cynpai



Part of a series of stamps for #EndangeredInc. If you love endangered animals, and would like to know more about them, please join!

If you would like to request a stamp for an endangered animal, please click here! Stamp requests are always free!
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:iconwolves09492:
wolves09492 Jun 20, 2013   Traditional Artist
Actually, Pandas aren't considered actual bears, a lot of resources say that it's more related to the raccoon family than anything else, but anyway, yes! Save the bears and pandas! but most bears are in a good place pandas if you count them as a bear need some help well a lot of help
Reply
:iconcynpai:
Cynpai Jun 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You're thinking of red pandas, which are not listed here at all. Giant pandas are bears.
Reply
:iconwolves09492:
wolves09492 Jun 21, 2013   Traditional Artist
ohhh--- so red pandas look more like a fox or k9 than a bear to me
Reply
:iconcynpai:
Cynpai Jun 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Names can be deceiving. Guinea pigs aren't from Guinea, maned wolves aren't wolves, and red pandas aren't pandas.
Reply
:iconwolves09492:
wolves09492 Jun 21, 2013   Traditional Artist
true and the red wolf is more is more or coyote
Reply
:iconcynpai:
Cynpai Jun 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Bingo. :thumbsup:
Reply
:iconwolves09492:
wolves09492 Jun 21, 2013   Traditional Artist
yep
Reply
:icona3dkid:
I heard one reason they're being spotted more by native tribes is polar bears are moving south due to lack of ice up north, I'm not sure. However Polar and Brown bears are the only bear species to interbreed in the wild, and in captivity both male and female offspring are fertile. Do you believe genetic pollution may become a more significant threat in the future? The term is propping up a lot more than often nowadays.

It's also good that you listed the sun bear as well. It's the ONLY bear here in Indonesia, and even here it's not that famous. Maybe just for an add on, one reason why it's declining is the illegal pet trade (it's both the tamest and smallest, an instant victim).

Spectacled bear too! Imagine that, a South American bear and the closest thing to Arctodus Simus (even if it looks like a pipsqueak next to it...)
Reply
:iconcynpai:
Cynpai Jan 25, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
We can't be sure, because there hasn't been a population assessment for years, and frankly, the polar bear has just become such a tool in the war against oil and energy that I wouldn't trust any assessment that came out. Environmentalists won't let us safely drill in the Rockies or the arctic, but they prefer deep-water drilling, which is extremely risky, and increases the chances of an uncontainable oil spill immensely. And every bad story about oil is good for their agenda. Like with what happened with BP.

Genetic pollution is always a threat to a species facing extinction. Conservation groups tried to save the "red wolf," but as it would turn out, the species was so diluted with dog and coyote, that it's not even a wolf anymore. If genetic pollution truly becomes a problem, Brown bears and Polar bears will likely go the way of the Barred and Spotted owls. The Spotted owls were declared "endangered" in a political move by environmentalists to keep loggers out of forests. Barred owls started mating with the spotted owls, and out-competing them for food and territory. If the spotted owls ceased to be pure, or they were all killed by the barred owls, they would lose their protection status, and logging would be open again. So, what's the solution? Shoot the barred owls to keep the land locked away from loggers. It's a horrible abuse of taxpayer dollars and a waste of our resources. But, anyway, I don't think that genetic pollution is prevalent enough in polar bears to raise any red flags right now, but should it ever come to fruition, expect a spike in brown bear hunting.
Reply
:icona3dkid:
Deep water? DEEP WATER? After BP and Exxon and all that? Some still want DEEP WATER! That's genuinely surprising (and infuriating) for me! I mean really, after all this time, after all that effort, they STILL want Deep water. Lives of fishermen were ruined, birds couldn't fly and that shark from the gulf had his/her gills clogged and some people STILL believe... Deep Water Drilling iz guud... I actually think they're just as much in it for the money and publicity like BP and any other oil company. The logic doesn't make sense. As someone who studies business, logically speaking you would want to drill in the most isolated, barren place because it does not support that much of an ecosystem. It also costs less for maintenance considering the damaging effects saltwater has on metals. The ocean forms the basis for ALL ecosystems, one slip up and its all over!

The bear thing was actually something interesting thing I studied for ecology class on the role of tertiary consumers. Got the original information from the BBC, said case was explored later in other websites. At first it became a way to study heredity of different species (never knew Polar bears are really just very, very recent descendents of brown bears from Europe)... then other articles warped it into an argument of how "baaaad" humans are.

But that story about owls is pretty sad. The spotted owl isn't even that far above "Low Risk" in the IUCN. To say that they are "endangered" is absurd. Who are these people anyway? Most of these "movements" tend to have no relation to any major conservation group. It's sad that because of this logic that one species of owl is being outcompeted and interbreeding because of some group of so-called "environmentalists".
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